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[ News for October 2016

Reflexive verbs and reflexive pronouns

In Swedish, and many other languages, we find reflexive verbs and reflexive pronouns. If you speak Spanish, French or German, it might be better to compare Swedish to any of these languages, rather than to English.

 

This is what the reflexive pronouns look like:

Singular                                             Plural

Jag tvättar mig.                                 Vi tvättar oss.           

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“Det” is a personal pronoun that can be used in many ways. In this article I will do my best to guide you to how to use “det”.

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Hej igen!

During a lesson the other day, the words “även” and ännu” came up. These words might be confusing, especially if you’re translating from English when speaking Swedish, so let me try to clear things up for you.

 

Även

1.       Även – also. Swedish synonyms are ”också”, ”därtill” and ”likaså”. Here are a couple of examples when ”även” is synonymous with “också”:

Boken är spännande. Den är även lärorik.

(The book is exciting. It is also informative.)

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When you start to learn Swedish, it doesn’t take long until you run into words like “tycker om” and “kommer ihåg”. Swedish is full of that kind of verb phrases, and we call them “particle verbs” (partikelverb). The particle can look like a preposition (på, in, upp), but can also be a word that is only used in combination with a verb. For example, the particles “ihjäl” and “ihåg”, will only be found in particle verbs not by themselves, or as a preposition.

A great thing with the particle verbs is that you can be very precise. Let me show you what I mean with a few examples:

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When learning a new language, you sometimes feel that you can’t express different shades of meaning. Something that can be a little help on the way to a more nuanced Swedish is the so-called “hjälpverb” (auxiliary verbs in English). So today I wanted to share with you ten useful “hjälpverb”. Varsågoda!

1. ska (will)

This verb has many functions. First of all, we can use to express future tense:

Jag ska åka på semester snart.

(I’m going on vacation soon.)

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[ News for March 2016

Hejsan!

A long time ago, I got this question:

It would be a huge help if you could explain how and when to use the different words that mean before. I never know if it’s förr, or if it’s innan. [...] and I’ve heard a word like förns, or something, …

 

förr/förut

“Förr” has different meanings. First of all it simply means “before”, as in “earlier” or “previously”. Here are a couple of examples of how to use it.

Vi har träffats förr, eller hur?

(We have met before, haven’t we?)

 

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Hejsan!

A long time ago, I got this question:

It would be a huge help if you could explain how and when to use the different words that mean before. I never know if it’s förr, or if it’s innan. [...] and I’ve heard a word like förns, or something, …

 

förr/förut

“Förr” has different meanings. First of all it simply means “before”, as in “earlier” or “previously”. Here are a couple of examples of how to use it.

Vi har träffats förr, eller hur?

(We have met before, haven’t we?)

 

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[ News for January 2016

Far, får får får?
 
I often get the question about how to use the verb ”får”, it seems like it can be used in a 
 
thousand different ways, some students say. 
 
“Få” as a auxiliary verb
 
The first case of “få” that I want to shine some light on is when “få” has the function of an 
 
auxiliary verb (“hjälpverb” in Swedish). As a hjälpverb one can use “få” when expressing 
 
that someone is allowed to do something. Here’s an example:
 
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